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The Before Time » Jason’s Kashiwa First Timers Guide
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rulu ruru

post Jason’s Kashiwa First Timers Guide

August 24th, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 9:05 pm

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So what is the Jason First Timers Guide to Kashiwa? Well, in trying to get everything prepared for my first trip to Japan to train at the Hombu, I tried to get as much info together as possible. The goal to try and avoid getting lost, stranded, or just plain embarrassed. Unfortunately… I didn’t get quite the scoop I was looking for. The trip was fantastic anyway, and on my way back I came up with the idea to put together a sort of poor-mans guide for those making the same trek that I did. All of this info will be hopefully useful for your first trip. After that, you won’t need it, because you’ll know it all and lots more.

Please don’t let this serve as any sort of factor when it comes to deciding whether or not you’re ready to go to Japan. That’s not the purpose of this guide. But, if you’ve already decided to go, and you’ve stumbled across this guide while googling around for info (the same way that I originally had), then go for it. But be advised… I reserve the right to be totally wrong at any time.

With all that being said: Here’s the guide.

Some Links to go with this:

+ Map of downtown Kashiwa

+ Kashiwa Plaza Hotel website (it’s in japanese, but you can view it through the bablefish.altavista.com translator.)

+ Directions to the Hombu (Atago)

+ Japan Train Schedules

+ Japan Train Map In English (Print this!)

Making Hotel Reservations:
Calling up the Kashiwa Plaza Hotel to make reservations is a snap… if you speak japanese. It’s worth a try even if you don’t though, you might get lucky and get someone who can speak enough english to make your reservation. The other alternative is use the online system on their website. I’ve known people to use both methods. At the least, you’ll need to check their website for the phone number, and to see pictures of the different size rooms. (They are SMALL… like staying in an R.V.) I strongly suggest doubling up with someone and getting the double room with two beds. Everything is bigger, and it’s the same price.

When you get to the airport:
Flying into Narita airport, you end up in either Terminal 1, or Terminal 2. Which terminal it is only really matters when you go to leave. You’ll go through two or three different lines for customs. It’s a good idea to have a pen that actually works with you.

A bit of handiness… the luggage carts at Narita are free.

Once you get have your luggage and you’ve cleared customs… the first stop is to get cash. There is a money exchange window where you can trade in green backs for yen. You’ll have to fill a form out… which only takes a sec… and the girl at the window will exchange your money.

Whatever you do… do NOT get your dollars turned into Yen at the SFO airport. As of my last trip, the going rate was 99, SFO was giving 86, and Narita was giving 96. Big difference. You can use the ATM in Japan and get a much better exchange rate… I’ll go into that later on.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The money exchanger at Narita airport does not accept old version 20’s, 50’s, or 100’s. New version bills only!  Also, it’s a good idea to make sure that even though they are the new version, that they aren’t all ratty and worn.  It seems every trip I go on, at least one person ends up with a $100 bill that they can’t exchange.

Update 11/08:  The money exchanger at Narita airport accepts traveler’s cheques.  They give a better exchange rate by about 2 points or so.  I haven’t done this myself yet, but as soon as I verify that this is the case, I will update this guide again.  Again, this is unconfirmed.

Cash in hand, your next stop is getting a bus ticket to Kashiwa. There will be several travel service windows… so your best bet is to find the information window. There, you will find really hot girls that speak english, and they will point you to the correct window where you can get your bus ticket to Kashiwa.

At that window… All you have to say is “Kashiwa?”. The girl will get you a ticket for the next bus, which may not be for an hour or so. The bus stops are clearly numbered (1,2,3,etc), and just outside the doors from the ticket counters. The stop number will be printed on your ticket.
These bus stops service multiple buses. About a minute or two before a bus comes… people will start to line up, and an attendant will come around to tag your luggage. Show this person your ticket… he will wave you off if the next bus coming isn’t the one you should be on.

The bus ride to Kashiwa is about an hour and a half, and not super memorable.
The bus will announce it’s stops over a loudspeaker.
The bus is a hell of a lot easier than taking the train and having to drag your luggage around.  (The train is like 2 or 3 bucks cheaper, but a lot less comfortable, and there is a train change that involves going up and down a set of stairs… not fun.)

You’ll get off the bus in Kashiwa right in front of the Crest Hotel. (see the map of Kashiwa).
When you get off… don’t forget your luggage, and continue walking down the street in the direction that the bus was going. You are in the WEST side of Kashiwa. Kashiwa is laid out with the train station in the center, and all of the main streets radiating out from it like spokes. The thing that makes getting around kinda difficult is that the “blocks” aren’t square. Some have 3 sides… some 4, some 5, etc.
Follow the road that you are on, and it will end up at the train station. This is the heart of Kashiwa… it’s a good idea to always know what direction the train station is when you are out exploring.
The train station has two levels. On the upper level is where you actually go to get trains or cut through to the other side of Kashiwa. On the lower level is a few shops, and two imporatant landmarks… Starbucks (which may or may not be visible depending on whether or not it is open, there are steel shutters that roll down and cover not only the entrance but also the sign when it’s closed) and McDonalds (the US embassy). Head for McDonalds.

If you stand with your back to McDonalds, getting to the Kashiwa Plaza Hotel is easy.
- IF you are staying at “The Annex” of the Kashiwa Plaza Hotel… then head down the second street from the left (counting clockwise). The annex is a block or two down the street on the right hand side. It has a gold colored sign at about the 3rd story level with “ANNEX” written on it in english.
- IF you are staying at the Kashiwa Plaza Hotel proper, then walk down the first street on the left. The hotel is on the first block, about 50 feet down from the corner. When you see the black granite, you are there. The main entrance is actually down a few stairs.
(If you walk into the KPH regular and they send you to the Annex, or vice versa… don’t panic. It happens all the time.)

Checking In:
Most of the staff doesn’t speak english. However… they are used to gaijin. Just say “Check in” and “Reservation”, and show them your passport. They’ll hook you up. Chances are that they have your reservation paperwork sitting there already, and just need to match it up to your name.  Be advised, you have to pay IN CASH, IN YEN, IN FULL, IN ADVANCE. Fortunately… pretty much every place I went to in Japan (even small stores) will show you the yen amount by holding up a small calculator (if they don’t have a cash register).

Update 03/2009:  This just in… the Kashiwa Plaza Hotel ( in March of 2009) is now accepting major credit cards.  Woo-hoo!!  This makes life better, as the exchange rate you will get from a direct purchase like this is far better than anything you can get from exchanging cash or travelers cheques at the airport. ;)   I will confirm this in April 2009.

A note about paying for stuff in Japan:
There is almost always a little tray, like you’d see in a restaurant when they bring you the check. In Japan, even if the person is standing right there, you put the money in the tray… and they put your change in the tray. It’s just how they do things there.

A small note about the room key:
In your room, the lights won’t work. Why not? Because you didn’t plug in your room key. Just inside the door, where the main light switch is, there is a sort of socket. This is where the dangly keychain with the room key goes. When you stick it in, the lights/TV/AC and stuff all work. It’s a handy place to keep your key too. This however, makes it easy to get locked out when you just go to duck down the hall and grab a beer.  The handle of the free toothbrush works just as well.

The hotel expects you to turn in your key when you leave the hotel for the day. Just show it to them at the desk, and they’ll give you a card with your room number on it. I guess the keys are expensive or something. Anyways… give them the card back, you get your key. The only downside to this is that if you leave the ‘do not disturb’ sign on your door and leave… if they have your key, they know you’re not in the room, and the maid will make it up anyways. Some days I don’t turn in my key… and I get subtle dirty looks.

A small note about the hotel:
Every floor has vending machines. Vending machines are everywhere. Beer vending machines are rather nice. Some floors (not every one) in the KPH has a coin-op washer/dryer and ice machines too. This comes in handy. Also, free high-speed internet is available at the KPH. Go to the lobby counter and say “Internet?”. You’ll get a modem & network cable.

The Train Station:
The train station can seem intimidating… very little english, and almost always bustling. (Not to mention being completely full of school girls which can be distracting).
The trains all work like this…. you buy a ticket from a machine that looks kinda like an ATM. The ticket gets put into the turnstile… and pops out on the other side. Don’t lose your ticket. When you get off the train… you have to put the ticket back into the turnstile. If you don’t have enough money on it… the turnstile will close… and you’ll have to find a ticket machine to put more cash on it. I haven’t had to do this, so I don’t know exactly how that works.

The Kashiwa trainstation services TWO lines. The Tobu line (which goes to the hombu), and the Joban line. The Joban line pretty much goes everywhere else. There are banks of ticket machines… some issue tickets for the Joban line, some for the Tobu line. The Tobu line terminates at the Kashiwa station… so you can’t go the wrong way, or take the wrong train. The Joban line goes BOTH ways. When you go to leave for the airport… you’ll take the Joban line. (Assuming of course, that you don’t take a bus to the airport. The bus is infinitely easier than changing trains with all of your luggage, but I usually leave on a sunday directly after a class and can’t make it to the bus in time.)
How to tell which is which? The signs are in english. But, here’s where what is what in the station:

As you leave your hotel… go up the escalator to the second story terrace and head into the station, on your right it will branch off to the machines where you can buy tickets for the Tobu line, the turnstiles to get to the Tobu platform, and the stairs that go down to the platform. Should you not take the right turn and keep going through the station, farther in you’ll see a bigger bank of ticket machines on the left, under a very confusing visual map of where the Joban line goes, with the Joban turnstiles and platforms accross from the ticket machines. If you keep going through the station, you’ll pop out on another open air terrace on the other side… this is the East side of Kashiwa… which has many places to eat, ANOTHER starbucks, lots of bars, pachinko parlors, places to shop, etc.

How do you know when to be at the station? Easy… www.hyperdia.com. The trains are literally clockwork, always on time, but confusing as hell. This website lets you look up the timetable by chosing a starting point, an end point, and when you want to either leave the starting point or arrive at the ending point. It will show you when the train leaves… when it will get there… if you have to get off the train and transfer onto another train… and more importantly.. how much the fare is. (this is important!). The only problem is that the stop for the Hombu (Atago) is used on two different stations. When you put in Atago as the destination (or starting point).. it will reload the page with a couple of options for Atago. Choose Atago(Chiba). This is the one you want. I have no idea where the other Atago is. In any case… the fare for Kashiwa to Atago where the Hombu is at is 300 yen. IMPORTANT: Make sure your watch is correct!

Update 3/16/08: The fares have changed. Kashiwa to Ayase is now 290 yen.

If you’re not sure which fare machine is which in the Kashiwa station, remember this: Kashiwa to Atago is 300 yen on the Tobu Noda line. You can’t buy a 300 yen ticket from any of the Joban line machines (Kashiwa to Ayase).

Update 4/2/08: Forget all about the paper tickets and machines, you should get a “Suica” card. Go to the green ticket window next to the bank of Joban line ticket machines, and get a card. They cost 2,000 yen, and will come with 1,500 yen of credit on them. From the Joban machines, you can charge them up with yen. This card can be used on ALL trains going to Atago (the Tobu line), as well as all of the JR lines (like Joban & Chiyoda), as well as all of the subways in Tokyo. Just wave it over the receiver at the turnstile, and it’ll beep and show you your card balance. You don’t even have to take it out of your wallet! It’s truly the only way to go. When you leave Japan, Keep your suica card… you can continue to use it when you come back.

Update:   It has been pointed out that you can exchange your suica card back in at the green window where you buy them and get your 500 yen deposit back.  If that is what you want to do, then you aren’t required to keep the card forever… and you can always get another one.   (Thank you for the heads up Matt!)

Suica Card

Beep!

 

An important note about Japan trains:
They stop running around midnight. Don’t go anywhere without checking hyperdia first. (like going drinking down in shinjuku). The taxis in Japans are way silly stupid expensive. Most people in japan use their cellphones to lookup train schedules…. however… your cellphone won’t work in japan.  (There are some lucky exceptions to this, check with your provider.)

Getting to Atago station:
Atago is about 8 stops away from Kashiwa, and takes around half an hour. Don’t panic when the first two or three train stops are at stations where the signs have no english. The Atago stop is one stop AFTER Noda-shi, and the signs for both are in english.

Getting to the hombu from the Atago station: Ohashi sensei has put up this map, and these idiot-proof pictures of how to get there. It’s about a 3 minute walk. (about a block away). Keep in mind that the map of the train lines does NOT show all of the stops between Kashiwa and Atago or Ayase!!

Getting back to Kashiwa from Atago involves getting another ticket, and going UP the stairs to the other side of the tracks to the other platform. The train that go you there dropped you off on the close side, but the one going back is always on the other (far) side. Why do I mention this? I almost missed a train by waiting on the wrong side, and had to run up and over to get to the train just in the nick of time.

On the train:
Each car has seats that are reserved for the handicapped and the elderly. Make sure you’re not sitting in them. (there is a sign that’s kinda obvious above the seats I’m talking about). Also, there are pink squares on the ground where you stand to get on the train. These spots are reserved for women. If you stand in line on one, you’ll look like an idiot.

Missing a train:
Don’t panic if you miss a train. Chances are that another one just like it will be by in 5 to 15 minutes.

Forgetting stuff on the train:
Should you brainfart and leave your umbrella/gear bag/or any other such thing on the train, don’t worry. Seriously! Go to the attendant/information booth at the train station and find someone who speaks enough english to understand what it was that you lost, and in an hour or so you’ll get it back.

Pocari Sweat:
It’s in some vending machines, at most small 7-11 type stores, is very gatorade like, and completely rocks. (Big thanks JT for turning me on to this stuff!!!) As you will find out, there are a billion beverages in japan, and very few that have labels you can actually read. I have recently found out that Pocari Sweat contains M-S-G. Doh! No wonder it tastes so good! If you have a problem with M-S-G, you should avoid it.

Training in the Hombu:
There are a few things you can do that will help make training better for everyone. First, don’t leave anything in the hombu. Take any trash back to the hotel with you and throw it away there… Japan is really recycle-centric, so public garbage cans are not super common, and it’s rude to fill them up. Be mindful of where you put your bag/backpack/shoes. When the hombu gets full, there are piles of stuff everywhere which is totally not cool. When Soke’s translator is talking, or his administrator is talking (Ohashi sensei), be respectful and listen. Don’t just start milling about and talking just because you’ve bowed out. When someone is speaking for Soke, they are to be shown the same respect that you’d show Soke.

 

This one is important: If you take a picture of/with Soke or the Shihan, make sure that you DO NOT use the flash on your camera. If need be, do a test shot in the other direction. These men have been photographed so many times throughout their lives that the flashes will harm their eyes… especially Soke. I saw many people ask politely for a picture, be told “Ok.. no flash!”, say “yes sensei..”, then proceed to take a flash picture.

Try to have exact change when you pay your mat fee. For Soke’s classes, this means having a 500 yen coin. A handy thing to do is buy your train ticket with a 1000 yen bill… which gives you 700 yen ( one 500, and two 100 yen coins) change. The extra two coins come in handy for beer vending machines. ;) On that note… do NOT show up to training stinking like beer, or drunk. Believe it or not, some people have done this, and it’s completely not ok.

Tabi:
A great spot to buy tabi/kyahan and other things is a small open air store in Atago. To get to it, walk back like you’re going to the train station, but keep going past it. Continue down the street till you see the temple. Hang a left, and go down about a block… it’s on your left… you can’t miss it.

The tabi store in Noda

Getting to Ayase/Tokyo Budokan:
(see the map)
When training at the Tokyo Budokan, make sure you know what time your class is. I point this out, because I showed up late by remembering the wrong time. (at the Hombu, there’s a big chart with who is teaching what and where.) Of course, use hyperdia.com to get your trains figured out. When you get off of the train, you’ll exit onto a fairly busy street. On your side of the street it will be bustling with shops and places to eat. The easiest way I’ve found to get to the Budokan is to cross the street, and turn right. Walk down until you see a park/open area that’s about a block wide, but seems to go really far back. This is the park on the map. Walk down the park to the end, and on your left will be the Tokyo Budokan complex. Find your way inside (slightly to the left), and you can ask the girl at the counter where to go. They have lockers inside for your shoes, and slippers you can barrow. Don’t go walking around in there with your muddy boots. Keep in mind WHICH budo dojo at the Budokan you are heading for. The numbering system isn’t obvious. Like.. the 2nd budo dojo is on the 3rd floor. Say what? Yeah. Just get there a little early, you’ll find where you need to be. Also, keep in mind that this ain’t the hombu… lots of folks are there doing other arts… so don’t act you own the place. Train fare from Kashiwa to Ayase is 290 yen. (Yes, the machines accept up to 200 yen worth of 10 yen coins… which is a handy way to get rid of them. On my first trip, I ended up with a big bag full of them, and every trip now I’m trying to spend them.)

Update: 4/2/08 - The Joban line does not stop in Ayase, but the Chiyoda line does. However, the Chiyoda line stops at every stop, and it’s faster to take the Joban to Matsudo, and change onto the Chiyoda from there. The Chiyoda line stops at Ayase, and Kashiwa. Very soon I’ll put up a map of the train lines where this will all make sense. Getting to Ayase from Tokyo is a little tricky, make sure you get on the Chiyoda line.

Training in Ayase: There are usually multiple events happening at the Tokyo Budokan at the same time. You may go to one of Soke’s classes and be sharing half the room with some other group. Do not walk across another groups section of the floor to get to your half… this is a big no-no, even if it’s only two people doing kendo. Be sure to walk around them on the raised part of the floor. (I point this out, because I did this, and Ohashi sensei was quick to point out my rudeness… which was terribly embarassing).

Police: In the rare circumstance that you are stopped by a Japanese policeman, remember 2 things. Number 1, do not hand over your passport. You may show it to them, but if you let them take it from you, you could end up royally screwed. Number 2, do not go into the little police sub-station/cube like offices. I’ve been told that this is a really bad idea, though it’s never been explained why. In parts of downtown Tokyo, being carded is not unheard of. The same thing goes for the airport. I was stopped 3 seperate times in the airport, though others have told me they’ve not been stopped in years. In Kashiwa, I don’t think I ever even saw a policeman. Obviously… never go anywhere without your passport.

Leaving Japan:
Hopefully you’ve done your homework and know which terminal you’re flying out of. This is good for using hyperdia to figure out which trains to take. By this time, you’ll be an old hat at the trains, and getting to the airport is no sweat. You’ll leave from the top floor at the terminal… where there are all sorts of souveiner shops, McDonalds, and ahhh… coin operated massage chairs. You can find loads of trinkets to bring home to family and friends in these shops, so have room in your luggage! The shops and food places are before you go through security/customs/etc. After the security gate, there will be another place where you can exchange your un-used yen into dollars. They do not exchange coins though. However, the 100 yen coins are super useful… especially in the massage chairs.

Massage in Kashiwa: There are 3 legit massage places that I know of in Kashiwa. Each does a different style massage, which is totally handy after getting beaten all day.

Place #1: The first place is inbetween the sunKus store and the Annex. It’s on the 3rd floor… look for the sandwich board with pictures of someone getting a massage. They do a clothed shiatsu… and the owner speaks english. It’s a decent massage for the money.

Update: The place #1 has been remodeled. The english speaking manager is no longer there, but they have an english menu. (Ei-go menu kudasai?)  Also, they now have a 90 minute shiatsu/oil massage for 8,000 yen.

Place #2: Just past the Hub Pub (near the train station escalators) is a green sandwich board showing someone getting a massage. This place does clothed on-the-floor Thai style massage. Minimal english there… but if you like thai style, this place is good.
Place #3: On the east side of Kashiwa, take the pedestrian foot over-pass, and keep walking down that street. About 50 feet down is a sandwich board showing… you guessed it… massage. Go up the stairs and straight in. No english here… and a menu of massages. They do a sort of swedish with oil that’s semi-ok. Not as good as place #1.
I can’t vouch for any other place in kashiwa… because I actually found these in the opposite order that I listed them, and the #1 place is close, speaks english, and gives a good massage.

A great place to eat: If you’d like a great sit-down meal in Kashiwa that isn’t the standard ninja beef bowl or noodles… I highly reccommend a place I call “Kasuwe’s, the restaurant at the end the universe”. (It’s actually called Tsukasa, and there’s now an english menu that was provided generously by a ninja print shop.) There’s a picture of it below. It’s on the same street as the Annex… about a block or so down the street past it, and on the left. It’s small… but the yakitori there is fantastic, and the owner is really nice, and used to polite ninja’s coming by. The dinner isn’s expensive, but the drinks are. However, Tsukasa serves some amazing Sake’s that you can buy by the bottle to take home.

Kasuwe's... the restaurant at the end of the Universe.

 

Update: Don’t eat at the noodle place across the street from the Annex. They use enough MSG to kill a horse.


Lastly, Pachinko: The casino of Japan. Should you play and win (you get a bunch of balls when you win), it works like this: You trade in your balls (no pun intended) for small carnival like gift things. When you leave the parlor, about a door down or so you’ll see a non-descript window where they pay cash for the junky little gift things that you won. Since gambling is technically illegal, this is how they get around that. Oh… and wear earplugs… the noise can be deafening. There are attendants in the parlors that will happily show you how to use the change machine (a handy way to break all your 10,000 yen bills), and how the pachinko machines work. Long gone are the manual ones that took tokens.

After you’ve been in Japan training for a day or two, all of this information will be totally obvious to you. You may scratch your head and say “Why did he even bother to write it all down?”. Hopefully though, it’ll save you some “Doh!” moments here and there, and you’ll enjoy your time there just a little bit more.

 

( Directions to the Tokyo Budokan at Ayase )

Map to Budokan

When you leave the train station, walk to the right until you see the big pedestrian walking area. Follow it all the way down until you see the building on the left.  If you see a “Mister Donut”, you’re on the correct side of the tracks.

*Update: I keep forgetting to mention, the toilet paper at the hotel is like wax paper. It’s a good idea to either bring a roll of your own, or go walking around the train station for a while and collect the little packets of tissue that the cute girls hand out. I always take these when they hand them out… they just come in handy.

* More updates as of 4/2/08:

- Checkout time for the hotel is at 10:00am. Pack the night before, and don’t get too hammered. There’s nothing quite as un-fun as sitting on the bus back to the airport with a raging hangover.

- Don’t eat the pizza at Coco’s. It’s truly disgusting.

- Study the train map (once I get it put up) of the trains in Japan. It’s good to know where certain stations are in relation to others… so you don’t end up getting to the right train line, only to go to the wrong direction. Which way is Abiko?  Kita Senju?  Being oriented will really help you out.

- Using the ATM: I tried to use several ATM machines in Japan. I have found one that works. This is good to know, because you get a much better exchange rate for your dollars that you do at the airport. But, before you go to japan, let your bank know the dates that you’ll be in Japan. Also, make sure you have a 4 digit pin number. 5 digit ones will not work. If you have a per-day max withdraw limit, it will still be in force in Japan. This ATM that Greg sensei found has an “english” button, and is just as easy to use as one back home. They do charge a buck or something for the ‘not-your-bank-ATM-fee’, but who cares… the better exchange rate makes up for it. On my next trip, I’ll exchange just enough cash to cover the first days training, food, train, and the hotel room. But be advised… the ATM isn’t 24/7. It doesn’t open until 9:00am, and closes around 6:00pm. To get to it, leave the Annex, and turn right. It’s about 50 feet down the street heading away from the station, on the right… just passed Yoshinoya. (see pictures)

The ATM in Kashiwa

ATM in Kashiwa

Be advised that when it’s closed, a metal shutter obscures it from view. If you find other ATM’s in Kashiwa that work, please take a picture and email them to me (theonetruejason@hotmail.com) along with directions and I’ll include them in this guide.

- You don’t have to get a bus ticket back to the airport ahead of time. The driver will accept cash… just try to have exact change. The bus fare is 1,700 yen… and it takes between an hour and an hour and a half, depending on traffic. You catch the bus the same place it dropped you off.. at the Crest Hotel. Be there 15 minutes before it’s scheduled to leave. The bus leaves at 6:10am, 7:15am, 11:10am, 1:10pm, 3:10pm, and 5:40pm. Our bus left 5 minutes before it was supposed to.

- Flying to/from Japan used to have a weight limit of 70lbs per bag. This has changed. The new limit is now 50lbs per checked bag. If you are over, it’ll cost you a hundred bucks. Pack light, and do more loads of laundry.

- The cost for getting a belt embroidered at the little budo store on the way to the Tokyo Budokan in Ayase is 2,500 yen. (25 bucks). They can do it in an hour if they aren’t busy… but it’s best to drop off your belt and pick it up another day.

- If you go out looking for nice paper/boards for Soke’s calligraphy, it’s at Tokyu Hands. You won’t find it at the one in the Kashiwa train station, nor will you find it at the one in Shinjuku. It’s at the one in Shibuya.

- At your first training in the Hombu, be sure to copy down the schedule of classes that is posted there. Also, check Ohashi sensei’s website to find out when/where Soke’s classes are.

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